First Amendment – Religion and Expression

First Amendment – Religion and Expression

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

1st Amendment

  • Religion  
  • An Overview  
    • Scholarly Commentary 
    • Court Tests Applied to Legislation Affecting Religion 
    • Government Neutrality in Religious Disputes 
  • Establishment of Religion  
    • Financial Assistance to Church-Related Institutions 
    • Governmental Encouragement of Religion in Public Schools: Released Time 
    • Governmental Encouragement of Religion in Public Schools: Prayers and Bible Reading 
    • Governmental Encouragement of Religion in Public Schools: Curriculum Restriction 
    • Access of Religious Groups to Public Property 
    • Tax Exemptions of Religious Property 
    • Exemption of Religious Organizations from Generally Applicable Laws 
    • Sunday Closing Laws 
    • Conscientious Objection 
    • Regulation of Religious Solicitation 
    • Religion in Governmental Observances 
    • Religious Displays on Government Property 
    • Miscellaneous 
  • Free Exercise of Religion  
    • The Belief-Conduct Distinction 
    • The Mormon Cases 
    • The Jehovah’s Witnesses Cases 
    • Free Exercise Exemption from General Governmental Requirements 
    • Religious Test Oaths 
    • Religious Disqualification 
  • Freedom of Expression–Speech and Press  
  • Adoption and Common Law Background  
  • Freedom of Expression: The Philosophical Basis  
  • Freedom of Expression: Is There a Difference Between Speech and Press  
  • The Doctrine of Prior Restraint  
    • Injunctions and the Press in Fair Trial Cases 
    • Obscenity and Prior Restraint 
  • Subsequent Punishment: Clear and Present Danger and Other Tests  
    • Clear and Present Danger 
    • The Adoption of Clear and Present Danger 
    • Contempt of Court and Clear and Present Danger 
    • Clear and Present Danger Revised: Dennis 
    • Balancing 
    • The ”Absolutist” View of the First Amendment, with a Note on ”Preferred Position” 
    • Of Other Tests and Standards: Vagueness, Overbreadth, Least Restrictive Means, and Others 
    • Is There a Present Test? 
  • Freedom of Belief  
    • Flag Salute Cases 
    • Imposition of Consequences for Holding Certain Beliefs 
  • Right of Association  
    • Political Association 
    • Conflict Between Organization and Members 
  • Maintenance of National Security and the First Amendment  
    • Punishment of Advocacy 
    • Compelled Registration of Communist Party 
    • Punishment for Membership in an Organization Which Engages in Proscribed Advocacy 
    • Disabilities Attaching to Membership in Proscribed Organizations 
    • Employment Restrictions and Loyalty Oaths 
    • Legislative Investigations and the First Amendment 
    • Interference With War Effort 
    • Suppression of Communist Propaganda in the Mails 
    • Exclusion of Certain Aliens as a First Amendment Problem 
  • Particular Government Regulations Which Restrict Expression  
    • Government as Employer: Political and Other Outside Activities 
    • Government as Employer: Free Expression Generally 
    • Government as Educator 
    • Government as Regulator of the Electoral Process: Elections 
    • Government as Regulator of the Electoral Process: Lobbying 
    • Government as Regulator of Labor Relations 
    • Government as Investigator: Journalist’s Privilege 
    • Government and the Conduct of Trials 
    • Government as Administrator of Prisons 
    • Government and Power of the Purse 
  • Governmental Regulation of Communications Industries  
    • Commercial Speech 
    • Taxation 
    • Labor Relations 
    • Antitrust Laws 
    • Radio and Television 
    • Governmentally Compelled Right of Reply to Newspapers 
    • Regulation of Cable Television 
  • Government Restraint of Content of Expression  
    • Seditious Speech and Seditious Libel 
    • Fighting Words and Other Threats to the Peace 
    • Group Libel, Hate Speech 
    • Defamation 
    • Invasion of Privacy 
    • Emotional Distress Tort Actions 
    • ”Right of Publicity” Tort Actions 
    • Publication of Legally Confidential Information 
    • Obscenity 
    • Child Pornography 
    • Nonobscene But Sexually Explicit and Indecent Expression 
  • Speech Plus–The Constitutional Law of Leafleting, Picketing, and Demonstrating  
    • The Public Forum 
    • Quasi-Public Places 
    • Picketing and Boycotts by Labor Unions 
    • Public Issue Picketing and Parading 
    • Leafleting, Handbilling, and the Like 
    • Sound Trucks, Noise 
    • Door-to-Door Solicitation 
    • The Problem of ”Symbolic Speech ”
  • Rights of Assembly and Petition  
  • Background and Development  
    • The Cruikshank Case  
    • The Hague Case 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *